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Solving the problems of the world!

Young Peoples Book Awards

Interview a child and/or youth services librarian (virtually, or in person) and give a description and reflection of the interview

REFLECTION

I chose to interview the Head of the Information Services Centre at Gippsland Grammar School, Ms Marianne Lee, about a program she runs, “The Readers’ Cup”. This program is run as part of the school’s annual Cultural Festival. It involves students from years 7 and 8 participating in a house competition where four students from each house each read a shortlisted novel from the Children’s Book Council of Australia (CBCA) Award. Students then compete, answering 40 questions based on the novels and present a three minute creative response to any of the four novels.

Ms Lee commented that she is always looking for strategies to enhance a reading culture at the school and got the idea from a presentation she saw at a conference in 2011. Since then the event has grown in popularity with students volunteering to be part of it. When I asked Ms Lee about the importance of young peoples’ book awards she remarked that it is always good to honour the talents of writers. In particular she mentioned that the CBCA is worth our focus because it promotes Australian authors and literature. As the CBCA notes, “The CBCA presents annual awards to books of literary merit, for outstanding contribution to Australian children’s literature”. (“About the CBCA,” n.d., para. 1). It gives schools a reason to promote a love of literature, and encourage lifelong lovers of reading.

It was interesting to speak to Ms Lee. She gave me an insight into the reasons why celebrating book awards are important.  I learnt that using the reader’s cup she is able to showcase award winning books so young people can see both the appeal of writing a good book and the value of reading. Additionally this helped raise my awareness that book awards are a good place to start when choosing books for young adults. As the Young Adults Library Association points out, “We encourage adults to take an active role in helping individual teens choose those books that are the best fit for them and their families.” (“YALSA Book and Media Awards and Lists for Libraries,” n.d., para.1).

Speaking with Ms Lee also clarified with me the importance of professional development in this area. As the Australian Library and Information Association points out, “The dynamic and changing library and information environment demands that library and information professionals maintain and continue to develop their knowledge and skills so that they can anticipate and serve the information needs of society and their individual clients”. (“Professional development for library and information professionals,” n.d., para. 4). Ms Lee mentioned that she is always looking for strategies and it was at a professional development conference she got the idea for the reader’s cup. After 20 years as a teacher librarian she is still aware that she needs to be constantly researching, thinking, investigating and brainstorming so that she can provide the best service, support and knowledge to her students. This illuminated to me that as an information professional I will always have gaps in my knowledge and need to continue expanding, learning and educating myself so I can provide the best service possible to my clients.

REFERENCES

YALSA Book and Media Awards and Lists for Libraries. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.ala.org/yalsa/bookawards/booklists/members

About the CBCA. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://cbca.org.au/default.aspx?contentID=581

Professional development for library and information professionals. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia/policies-standards-and-guidelines/professional-development-library-and-information-professionals

APPENDIX

Interview with Ms Marianne Lee, Head of the Information Services Centre. Gippsland Grammar School, Sale, Victoria.

Can you tell me how the Readers cup works?

At Gippsland Grammar we use the Readers’ Cup competition as part of our annual Cultural Festival. We have a four House system at our school and the Readers’ Cup is open to any of our Year 7 and 8 students who love to read and like a challenge. Each House fields a team of four students who read four designated novels and then compete against the other House teams on the day of the Cultural Festival.

The competition is divided into two parts

  1. 40 questions (10 per novel) based on the four novels.
  2. A 3 minute creative response to any of the four novels. All students must be involved in this activity and there is a rubric to assist the judging.

Why did you choose this program?/Where did you get the idea from?

I am always looking for strategies to enhance a reading culture at Gippsland Grammar. We have reading programs embedded into our year 7,8 and 9 English curriculum as well as the Victorian premier’s Reading Challenge which is great but I was trying to give keen readers in our school a higher profile. We seem to be always acknowledging our athletes, musicians etc and accommodating them in being able to showcase their talents but rarely acknowledging our keen readers.

I first heard about the Readers’ Cup through SLAV about six years ago, Teacher Librarian Judith Way presented this activity at one of our SLAV Conferences. At the time she was teaching at Mill Park and brought along to the Conference students from her school who demonstrated what a Readers Cup looked like and sounded like. The students seemed to be having a great time and I thought it would be a good activity to introduce here.

I submitted a request to our Executive in 2011 to include a Readers Cup Competition in the Cultural Festival which was granted and so we had our first Cup in 2012.The Competition has being growing in popularity  ever since. At first, House Captain’s found it difficult to field teams as it competes against many other activities  and students weren’t quite sure what it was all about. However, it has now become a popular event and Houses have no trouble in organising teams. For example, this year there were 20 students wanting to be in a particular House team which is fantastic

What sorts of books do you use?

Each year we choose books from the CBCA shortlisted books from the previous year. We always buy four copies of these novels as we know that we can use them in our Year 8 “Reading in Pairs” activity and now the Readers Cup as well. The novels also need to be suitable for Year 7 and 8 sensibilities!

Do the students participate enthusiastically?

The students do participate enthusiastically. They have a lot of fun and good natured rivalry. They also get to eat lots of lollies. There is much excitement always from the winning team. Photos are taken and used for marketing purposes and winning students’ names are put on a plaque on the Readers’ Cup Trophy.

Why do you think it is important to have young people’s book awards? That is the CBCA Book of the year?

It is always good to honour the talents of writers and put a focus on reading. The CBCA is particularly worth promoting because it promotes Australian literature and Australian authors. It gives  schools a reason to promote a love of literature and hopefully encourages students to become lifelong lovers of reading, a life skill I can’t imagine not having for a well -rounded and satisfying life.

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Digital materials/resources and emerging technologies

Learn how to use a new tool, software, or game, and write about your experience

REFLECTION

Tumblr is a tool that I have never used before. So I downloaded the App on my iPhone and got started.  Tumblr is a microblogging platform and social networking website. It allows users to post multimedia and other content to a short-form blog. Users can follow other users’ blogs, as well as make their blogs private. (“Tumblr”, n.d., para 1.) It allows you to Post text, photos, quotes, links, music, and videos from your browser, phone, desktop, email or wherever you happen to be. You can customize everything, from colors to your theme’s HTML (“Tumblr lets you effort share anything”, n.d., para 1.).

Tumblr reminded me of Facebook, Twitter, WordPress and Instagram all combined into one. It allows you to do most of the things that those tools do but in a smaller, compact way. It took me a while to get the hang of setting up my profile and then to start following other users’ blogs. I had to work out what all the icons were for and what they did. But once I was up and running I was able to see what other users were doing and got a better idea about what Tumblr was about. I liked that you could enter search terms for your interests and then you could follow those blogs. Any posts made by those users would then appear in your news feed (very similar to Instagram). You can choose to like posts, and re-blog them if you like.

I can see how Tumblr could be beneficial in a library setting. In particular the school library I work in could set up a Tumblr blog and get students to follow. We could promote upcoming events, competitions, new books, subject information, links to the catalogue and all of the resources we have to offer. As Agosto (2009, p.33) notes, “networking sites are useful venues for promoting and delivering library services to young adults”.

Interestingly my research into Tumblr helped me to learn another valuable reason why social networking could be beneficial to libraries. It’s a place where information professionals can reach students or young people. That is, a place where we can reach them in their own environment. As Agosto (2009, p34) points out, “Using these sites can be a form of outreach, taking library services to where the users are instead of waiting for users to seek out the library.

In terms of my own knowledge of digital materials/resources and emerging technologies I realise I do have a gap in this area. After creating a Tumblr account I became aware that there could be many other Information Technology tools available to us that could be very useful to the library and reaching the students. For my own professional development I will be aware of this gap in my knowledge and do some research to find more relevant tools and also be aware that this information could be constantly improving. I need to keep my knowledge up-to-date in this area.

REFERENCES

Tumblr. (n.d.). Retreived from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tumblr

Tumblr lets you effort share anything. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.tumblr.com/about

Agosto, D. (2009). Teens and social networking: how public libraries are responding to the latest online trend. Public Libraries, 48(3), 32-37.

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Diversity

Analyse and evaluate a website designed for children or young adults

REFLECTION

I chose to analyse and evaluate the website, “Inside a Dog”. Inside a Dog is a website created by the State Library of Victoria. It is an interactive website where young people can find great reads, share their reviews of books, use the news blog or forums to discuss book news and hot topics, enter competitions, gain insights into authors in residence thoughts about writing and reading and join or create book clubs (“Welcome to Inside a dog,” n.d., para.2).

Inside a Dog is a great website with lots of interesting information. In particular I was interested in whether it catered to a diverse range of young adults. That is, young adults from a wide range of backgrounds including notable ones such as ethnic and racial minorities, those with disabilities, people with literacy challenges and those from other significant backgrounds within the community. (Jaeger, Bertot & Franklin, 2010, p.175). Library and information services have recently conducted research in this area surrounding the idea that the information profession has a duty to ensure that it includes resources, programs and services catering for all of our diverse communities (Jaeger, Bertot & Franklin, 2010, p.175).

Inside a Dog does seem cater for a diverse range of young adults. Evidence of this can be seen on the pages of the website where in general anybody from any background can feel comfortable contributing to the pages. Noteworthy suggestions of diversity can be seen on the residence page where the author in residence is asked about the importance of multicultural characters. Or on the Inky award page where young adults can win an Australian story or an International story award.

The only thing I would say about Inside a dog is that it could be more obvious about offering programs and services to our diverse community. They could create pages specifically for our multicultual society or offer some programs directed to those with literacy challenges. Although Inside a Dog does not discriminate, it does not specifically offer these services and this may be a shortcoming of the website. When discussing diverse communities, Mestre (2011, p.102.) argues, “If they do not see themselves, their values, or their needs reflected in web pages or at service points they may feel isolated and reluctant to explore the services.

It was interesting to look at this website and think about it in terms of diversity. I learnt that as an information professional in a secondary school I have a responsibility to provide a service for all types of students that come into the library.

I also realised that there is a gap in my knowledge in this area in terms of the fact that I may think that generally I am providing a service for the diverse community in my school but in reality there may not be enough services specifically catering for them. In an article by Blyton (2005, p.9.), she asks a number of questions such as, “do you consider student diversity when planning curriculum and research tasks?” or “do you promote cultural and linguistic diversity within the library through displays, captions and signs”. In terms of my professional devleopment and bridging the gap of knowledge that I have in this area, I need to ask myself these types of questions.

REFERENCES

Blyton, J. (2005). Responding to cultural diversity: LMERC and the school library. FYI: The Journal for the School Information Professional, 9(4), 8-10.

Jaeger, J., Bertot, J., & Franklin, R. (2010). Research in Practice Diversity, Inclusion and Underrepresented Populations in LIS Research. Library Quarterly, 80(2), 175-181.

Mestre, L. (2011) Visibility of Diversity within Association of Research Libraries Websites. Journal of Academic Librarianship, 37(2), 101-108.

Welcome to Inside a Dog. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.insideadog.com.au/

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Censorship

prezi clip

Censorship

Create and upload a virtual presentation for children or young adults (using any free or commercial tool)

REFLECTION

I chose to create a “Prezi” virtual presentation for young adults on the topic of censorship. My aim was to give young adults an understanding of the definition of censorship and the relevance this has to the selection of the resources in their own library. The items they use, or borrow, from their library have been chosen by their librarian. And for them to consider whether these items have been selected or censored (SIS, 2015).

The most useful thing I learnt from this activity is the fact that librarians have quite an important responsibility when choosing library resources. As Duthie (2010, p. 86), notes, “librarians must decide whether to enable an entirely free flow of information from other mediums or to take it upon themselves to protect readers from material that might be considered harmful”. There is a fine line between just selecting materials or censoring them. As Youth Librarians we need to find a balance between what we personally believe are appropriate resources for our young adult customers and what they should have available to them as citizens of a free flowing information society.

This activity was relevant to my professional practice as a librarian for children or young adults as now I have a greater understanding and awareness of censorship. In my position as library assistant at a secondary school I regularly choose books and resources for the students. I actually have never been consciously aware that I could possibly be censoring items based on what I believe is appropriate. I have also not been aware of the statement from Australian Library Information Association (ALIA), which directs librarians to, “promote the free flow of information and ideas in the interests of all Australians and a thriving culture and democracy”. (“Statement on free access to information,” n.d., para.1). I will now use this information in my profession to ensure I am aware of the responsibility I have when choosing resources.

As mentioned above I do have gaps in my knowledge on this subject. I was not really aware of my responsibility when choosing resources to be conscious of ALIA’s statement on free access to information. As Moody, (2005, p. 138) notes, “censorship can also occur in libraries in various covert and often unconscious ways”. This has most likely been me!! In addition, I also have gaps in my knowledge as to the arguments for censorship, That is, that fine line where it might be needed. As Duthie (2010, p.89) notes, “In various ways and to various degrees, all endorse the notion of a moral obligation to protect the public, particularly its younger members, from harm”. I will endeavour to fill these gaps by seeking out further information on this subject and keeping up-to date and relevant in this area

REFERENCES

Duthie, F. (2010). Libraries and the Ethics of Censorship. The Australian Library Journal, 59(3), 85-94.

Moody, K. (2005). Covert censorship in libraries: a discussion paper, The Australian Library Journal, 54(2), 138-147.

SIS. (2015). Library Services for Children and Youth [INF330 Module 6.4]. Retrieved May 14, 2015, from Charles Sturt University Website: https://interact2.csu.edu.au/webapps/blackboard/execute/displayLearningUnit?course_id=_6560_1&content_id=_345558_1

Statement on free access to information. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.alia.org.au/about-alia/policies-standards-and-guidelines/statement-free-access-information

APPENDIX

http://prezi.com/sxsrlhn7s6ke/present/?auth_key=f50u855&follow=bv3i09131p48&kw=present-sxsrlhn7s6ke&rc=ref-1257728

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INF330 Library Services for Children and Youth

I’m excited to be working on Assessment 2 for this subject! – Professional Development Blog.

Stay tuned for some fantastic posts!!

IMG_7023

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OLJ Evaluative Report

Lyn McNally
Student Number: 11384678
INF206 – Social Networking for Information Professionals

Assessment Item 3 – Evaluative Report

Table of Contents
Introduction
3 social networking experiences
My Development as a social Networker
Conclusion
References


Introduction
This aim of this report is to show you how I, as a student of this subject has benefited from learning about social networking technologies and how this learning will help my development as an information professional. I will endeavour to do this by providing some evaluative statements on my learning in this area

3 social networking experiences
In order to understand social networking technologies and tools, their features and functionality, concepts theory and practice of library 2.0, how these technologies can support informational and collaborative needs of organisations and how information policy can support issues that exist in a socially networked world, I considered and evaluated three social networking experiences. Following is an evaluation of these experiences:

My first experience was setting up my own social networking site. I set up a diigo account. This website allows you to bookmark sites you might find useful.

Lin & Tsai (2011, p. 1249), define social bookmarking as, “one of the Web2.0 applications that allows users to keep, annotate and manage favourite web pages online while searching the Internet to glean applicable information resources”. After using diigo I found there were some features and functions of the site that were quite valuable. These included the ability to tag sites, which means to attach a specific piece of information to a site so that you or others can recognize it (Derntl, Hampel, Motschnig-Pitrik & Pitner, 2011, p. 1460). Tagging comes in very handy if you have bookmarked a lot of sites and wish to find ones related to a certain subject. The ability to set up groups and bookmark websites relevant to that particular group is also another function of diigo that is very useful.

Diigo could be very valuable to different information organisations. For example in a secondary school library, students could set up diigo accounts and different groups could be set up for specific subjects or projects. Students could then find websites relevant to the subjects/projects and bookmark them to the groups. Fellow students could log in and as members of the groups also make use of the relevant bookmarked websites. This type of sharing and collaboration could help with learning in schools.

My second experience was to consider being increasingly aware of the concept of Web 2.0. Abram (2005, p.44), explains Web 2.0 as “being about human interactivity with the World Wide Web and about conversations, interpersonal networking, personalisation and individualism”. It could be described loosely in contrast to Web 1.0 as not being passive (Web 1.0) but Interactive (Web 2.0).

So what if we were to consider Web 2.0 in terms of being an information professional? What essential knowledge, skills and attributes should an information professional have in a Web 2.0 world? I believe that information professionals in a Web 2.0 world need to be supporting and following the concepts of Web 2.0. Peltier-Davis (2009, p.21) explains it as being about information professionals understanding the power of Web 2.0 and taking advantage of the opportunities available to use this technology. It’s about making a commitment to continuously learn and improve library services by using the tools of Web 2.0.

I couldn’t agree with Peltier-Davis more. If information professionals are to survive in a Web 2.0 world they need to be committed. They need to take advantage of any opportunity to interact with others in order to hook them into the library. It is about education. Information professionals need to be prepared to never stop learning. They need to have the skills and attributes to constantly be aware of new technologies and how these can help their libraries and their patrons.

Finally my third experience was after watching a Youtube video; “did you know 4.0″, created in 2009. I noticed five examples of “shifts” or trends that could have an impact on how individuals behave as digitals citizens. It is interesting to consider how these behaviours could impact on the need for, and development of, information policy in organisations. As an employee of a secondary school library I am considering these five examples in relation to information policy in my work place.

The first relevant shift I noticed was print circulation. Newspaper circulation is down 7 million in the last 25 years. In our library historically newspapers were a major way for students to find information. We now have to consider the opportunities for different ways of finding information of this kind. Our information policy needs to include points about finding newspaper articles digitally.

The second shift relates to the increase in digital advertising. How do we promote our library now? We need to consider a new policy for data protection. Data protection is about having the permission of the data subjects to use their information (Dearnley & Feather, 2001, p. 74). Can we market our library to students via their ipads, laptops or mobile phones?

The third shift is the increase in visitors to social networking sites such as facebook, myspace and youtube. We need to ensure we have policy about using these social networking sites in the library to interact with our students.

In 2008, 95% of songs downloaded weren’t paid for. Students are so savvy and aware of finding things online. Do we, in the library, need to consider that information needs to be readily available and easily downloadable at no cost? Do we need to consider copyright? A right that protects authors against the improper or unnaproved use of their work (Dearnley & Feather, 2001, p. 69). If we don’t provide some sort of policy on this, will the students will go elsewhere?

The fifth shift relates to the increase in how much teenagers use their mobile phones for text messaging. Could we text message them with overdues, new resources, what’s on in the library. Again this relates to data protection policy.

My Development as a social Networker

As a result of studying this subject it is wise to consider my development as a social networker and the implications for my development as an information professional. I wish to do this by providing a reflective statement on my studies.

So firstly I will reflect on my development as a social networker. A social networker could be described as someone who is part of a social network and uses social networking sites. The OCLC, (“Sharing, Privacy and Trust in Our Networked World: A Report to the OCLC Membership 2007) defines a social network as, “a map of the relationships between individuals, showing the ways they are connected. The term was first used in 1954 by sociologist J.A. Barnes”. And social networking sites as, “web sites primarily designed to facilitate interaction between users who share interests, attitudes and activities. Examples include Facebook, Mixi and MySpace”.

During this subject I have set up Diigo, Facebook, Second life, Flickr accounts and a WordPress blog. These are all examples of social networking sites. My development of these social networking sites means that I now have a greater understanding of what it is to bookmark a site on diigo, create an avatar in second life, make a post on facebook, post a photo in flickr and write a post on my blog. Some of these things I have done before (for example a facebook post) but some I haven’t. I also now understand how contributing to these sites can allow me to interact and connect with others, to collaborate others and learn things I may not have known before.

But the real bonus of increasing my knowledge about social networking are the implications for my development as an information professional. I have learnt two important things. I will discuss these now:

The first thing I have learnt is about some tools I could bring into my work. I work in a secondary school library and these social networking tools could give me some resources and knowledge to bring back to my workplace.

One example of this is 3D virtual worlds. Previously I did not even think about the possibility of using a virtual world for educational purposes. In an article by Frank (2008), she considers the possibility of using virtual worlds as an environment not just for play, but for exploring the possibilities of simulation, role-playing and creation of educational activities. In an educational setting such as the library I work in, I could provide virtual world instructions from an avatar for how to use various library resources. This is a great new tool I could bring into my workplace.

The second important thing is that I now have the knowledge and ability to keep learning about new technologies. I now understand the importance of continuously educating myself in this area. Research undertaken in 2010 by Partridge, Lee and Munro concluded that librarians must know how to maintain their own ongoing professional education they must have an inquiring mind, enjoy playing and experimenting, and love learning. (Partridge, Lee & Munro, 2010, p.13). I now understand the importance of keeping relevant, continuously educating myself, keeping up to date with technological trends. This will greatly help me and my development as an information professional

Conclusion

In conclusion as a student of this subject, I have benefited from learning about social networking technologies. This knowledge will greatly help my development as an information professional.

References

Abram, S. (2005). Web 2.0 – huh?! Library 2.0, Librarian 2.0. Information Outlook, 9(12), 44-46.

Dearnley, J. & Feather, J. (2001). Information policy. In The wired world : an
introduction to the theory and practice of the information society (pp. 60-93). Retrieved from CSU Library

Derntl, M., Hampel, T., Motschnig-Pitrik, R., & Pitner, T. (2011). Inclusive social tagging and its support in Web 2.0 services. Computers in Human Behaviour, 27(4), 1460-1466.

Frank, I. (2008). Second Life: A Virtual World Why Are Librarians There. In First Monday, Retrieved from http://firstmonday.org/ojs/index.php/fm/article/viewArticle/2222/2010

Lin, C. & Tsai, C. (2011). Applying social bookmarking to collective information searching (CIS): An analysis of behavioural pattern and peer interaction for co-exploring quality online. Computers in Human Behaviour, 27(3), 1249-1257.

Partridge, H., Lee, J., & Munro, C. (2010). Becoming “Librarian 2.0” The Skills, Knowledge, and Attributes Required by Library and Informationn Science Professionals in a Web 2.0 World (and Beyond) Library Trends, 59(1-2), 315-335

Peltier-Davis, C. (2009). Web 2.0, library 2.0, library user 2.0, librarian 2.0: innovative services for sustainable libraries. Computers in Libraries, 29 (10) 16-21

Sharing, Privacy and Trust in Our Networked World: A Report to the OCLC Membership (2007), Retreived from http://www.oclc.org/content/dam/oclc/reports/pdfs/sharing.pdf

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Digital Citizens

After watching the Youtube video “did you know 4.0” created in 2009 I noticed five examples of “shifts” or trends that can have an impact on how individuals behave as digitals citizens. It is interesting to consider how these behaviours could impact on the need for, and development of, information policy in organisations. As an employee of a secondary school library I am considering these five examples in relation to information policy in my work place.

The first relevant shift I noticed was print circulation. Newspaper circulation is down 7 million in the last 25 years. In our library historically newspapers were a major way for students to find information. We now have to consider the opportunities for different ways of finding information of this kind. Our information policy needs to include a move pushing towards finding newspaper articles digitally.

The second shift relates to the increase in digital advertising. How do we promote our library now? We need to consider a new policy of marketing our library that reaches students on their ipads, laptops, mobile phones. Digitally.

The third shift is the increase in visitors to social networking sites such as facebook, myspace and youtube. We most likely need to consider in our information policy the idea to start using these social networking sites in the library to interact with our students. What ways can these sites help our libraries?

in 2008 95% of songs downloaded weren’t paid for. Students are so savvy and aware of finding things online. Do we, in the library, need to consider that information needs to be readily available and easily downloadable at no cost? Do we need to provide this service? Because if we don’t, will the students will go elsewhere? Our information policy needs to consider this.

The fifth shift relates to the increase in how much teenagers use their mobile phones for text messaging. Does our information policy need to consider this as a way for reaching students? With overdues, new resources, what’s on in the library.

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A Web 2.0 Information Professional

As we move further into this continuously advancing technological age we are increasingly aware of the concept of Web 2.0. Abram (2005, p.44) explains Web 2.0 as being about Human interactivity with the World Wide Web and about conversations, interpersonal networking, personalisation and individualism. In one of my previous posts I defined it loosely in contrast to Web 1.0 as not being passive but Interactive. The ability to use your computer keyboard to interact with a website or to interact with other individuals via a website.

So what if we are to consider Web 2.0 in terms of being an information professional? What essential knowledge, skills and attributes should an information professional have in a Web 2.0 world? Well I believe that information professionals in a Web 2.0 world need to be supporting and following the concepts of Web 2.0. Peltier-Davis (2009, p.21) explains it as being about information professionals understanding the power of Web 2.0 and taking advantage of the opportunities available to use this technology. It’s about making a commitment to continuously learn and improve library services by using the tools of Web 2.0.

I couldn’t agree with Peltier-Davis more. If information professionals are to survive in a Web 2.0 world they need to be committed. They need to be continuously learning about new Web 2.0 technologies and integrating them into the libraries. Taking advantage of any opportunity to interact with others in order to hook them into the library. Its about education. Information professionals need to be prepared to never stop learning. They need to have the skills and attributes to constantly be aware of new technologies and how these can help their libraries and their patrons.

Abram, S. (2005). Web 2.0 – huh?! Library 2.0, Librarian 2.0. Information Outlook. 9.12 (Dec. 2005) p44.

Peltier-Davis, C. (2009). Web 2.0, library 2.0, library user 2.0, librarian 2.0: innovative services for sustainable libraries. Computers in Libraries (COMPUT LIBR), 2009 Nov-Dec; 29 (10): 16-21.

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5 Key pieces of advice to embrace library 2.0

In 2007 at the University of California, as part of a symposium on transforming libraries into 2.0 libraries a number of key points were raised by a number of speakers. These key points were quite interesting as advice for libraries to embrace a 2.0 ethos.

In terms of my own employment and the secondary school library I work in there were five pieces of advice from the symposium that I would consider helpful for us to embrace 2.0 in our library. These points are as follows

1. Know our users. Do we really know what our users want? We could survey them to see what they are into so that we could bring this into the library. Use facebook to ask students what books they would like the library to have more of.
2. Question everything. Continuously ask ourselves are the things we are doing in the library worth doing? Or are they old fashioned or not worthwhile anymore?
3. Communicate better with our patrons. When we know an assigment give students resources. Blog directly with patrons – we do care about them and what they think.
4. Use 2.0 tools to highlight our collections – flickr photos of our collections and library displays
5. Go to where our users are – if students arent using the library go to them – how we can provide hooks into our web presence. Provide portals to our library in spaces where are users are already in

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Arizona State University Libraries

I visited Arizona State University (ASU) Library’s collection of Library Minute Videos and their Library Channel Suite.
Being aware of the rise of social networking and the concept of Library 2.0, I considered these tools used by ASU in relation to the 4Cs of Web 2.0: collaboration, conversation, community and content creation.

I believe that ASU very much respects these principles with the services it has to offer. The one minute videos are very entertaining (I particularly liked the inclusion of Rick Astley’s, “Never gunna give you up” in one of them :-)!! ). They provide valuable information about the services ASU Libraries has to offer and encourages students to become involved by inviting them to provide feedback and ideas about what they need. Library Channel Suite promotes and publicizes the use of web 2.0 tools such as facebook, twitter, flick (and the list goes on) for students to be a part of the libraries community in any way they can.

Collaboration, conversation, community and content creation very much seems to be the order of the day at ASU libraries.

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TL in the cloud

A website created by a Teacher Librarian who tends to float away in the clouds

The getting of wisdom

A fine WordPress.com site

Mad Ramblings

PLN Course 2013

Hydrangina's Blog

Digital tools for learning

AngelaBradyPLN2013

Knowledge is free at the library ~ just bring your own container. Anon.

lynteresting

Solving the problems of the world!

Douchy's Blog

On ICT and Education

Mizzktee

Leading... Learning... Teaching

Book'emJase

Life, the Universe and Everything I think about it.

In the Know

Solving the problems of the world!